Splenic Embolization Decreases Infectious Complications and Resource Utilization Compared to Splenectomy in Severely Injured Patients

Authors

  • James M Haan University of Kansas Medical Center:KU School of Medicine-Wichita, 1010 North Kansas, Wichita, KS 67214-3199, USA.
  • Grant V Bochicchio
  • Anne Conway
  • Kelly M Bochicchio
  • Thomas M Scalea

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v7i2.11485

Keywords:

spleen/injuries, splenectomy, therapeutic embolization, infection/complications

Abstract

Introduction. Increasing use of main coil angioembolization for splenic injury has raised concerns of increased complication rates and resource utilization compared to splenectomy. This study examined complication rates for severely injured patients undergoing splenectomy versus main coil angioembolization. Methods. Demographic data (age, sex, and race), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and splenic injury grade were collected prospectively on all patients admitted to the intensive care unit with blunt splenic injury treated with splenectomy or main coil angioembolization. Outcome measures (transfusion requirements, mechanical ventilation use and duration, mortality, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay, infection rate, and systemic inflammatory response syndrome or SIRS score) were reviewed daily. Results. Of 116 patients reviewed, 65 underwent splenectomy and 51 underwent main coil angioembolization. Groups were comparable for age, sex, race, and mechanism of injury. Splenectomized patients had a higher ISS (41 vs 31) and splenic injury grade (3.7 vs 3.2). The main coil angioembolization group had a lower transfusion requirement, hospital length of stay, incidence of mechanical ventilation, nosocomial infection rate, and SIRS score. Overall, mortality and ventilator days were lower but not statistically significant. Conclusions. Severely injured patients treated with splenectomy had significantly higher infection rates and resource utilization compared to those treated with main coil angioembolization.

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Published

2014-05-22

How to Cite

Haan, J. M., Bochicchio, G. V., Conway, A., Bochicchio, K. M., & Scalea, T. M. (2014). Splenic Embolization Decreases Infectious Complications and Resource Utilization Compared to Splenectomy in Severely Injured Patients. Kansas Journal of Medicine, 7(2), 50–57. https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v7i2.11485

Issue

Section

Original Research