How Much Education and Training do Residents Across Specialties Receive in Neuropsychology?

Authors

  • Seher Chowhan, D.O. KUMC-Wichita
  • Phillip K. Martin, Ph.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita
  • Matthew Macaluso, D.O. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita
  • Christina Bowman, M.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita
  • Ryan W. Schroeder, Psy.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.vol1415200

Keywords:

neuropsychology, resident training, residency curriculum, national survey

Abstract

Introduction. Neuropsychologists play an important role on multidisciplinary teams with physicians from multiple specialties. The extent of residency training on the use of neuropsychological services is unclear. We surveyed medical residents across multiple specialties throughout the United States to assess resident education, training, and understanding of neuropsychological services, along with their likelihood to consult neuropsychologists in the future.

Methods. A survey was sent to residents in accredited psychiatry, neurology, family medicine, and internal medicine programs. After data were collected, chi-square group level analyses with post-hoc pairwise comparisons were used to analyze the data.

Results. 434 residents took the survey. The proportion of residents exposed to neuropsychology during residency varied significantly according to specialty χ2 (3, N=419) = 51.4, p < .001, with more psychiatry and neurology residents reporting exposure than residents in family medicine or internal medicine. Similarly, the proportion of psychiatry and neurology residents who ‘agree’ or ‘strongly agree’ that they understand the nature of neuropsychological services differed significantly from family medicine and internal medicine residents χ2 (3, N=415) = 40.4, p < .001. The majority of residents across all specialties (85.7%) reported they are likely to consult/order neuropsychological services in future practice.

Conclusions. The majority of residents in all specialties reported exposure to neuropsychological services in some manner, but forms of exposure varied. Results indicate a need for increased education and training in neuropsychological services, especially within family medicine and internal medicine programs. The majority of residents agreed that they would utilize neuropsychology services in future practice.

Author Biographies

Phillip K. Martin, Ph.D., University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita

Neuropsychologist, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Matthew Macaluso, D.O., University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita

Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Assistant Dean of Research

Christina Bowman, M.D., University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita

Psychiatrist

Ryan W. Schroeder, Psy.D., University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita

Neuropsychologist, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Downloads

Published

2021-08-04

Issue

Section

Original Research