An Evaluation of SmokeFree for Kansas Kids

An Intervention to Promote Tobacco Cessation in Pediatric Clinics

Authors

  • Thanuja Neerukonda University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS
  • Taneisha S. Scheuermann, Ph.D. University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
  • Stephen J. Lauer, M.D., Ph.D. University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, Department of Pediatrics
  • Melissa Hudelson Kansas Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics, Lenexa, KS
  • Edward F. Ellerbeck, M.D., MPH University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v10i1.8641

Keywords:

smoking cessation, pediatrics, tobacco smoke pollution

Abstract

Introduction. Smokefree for Kansas Kids is a program designed
to train pediatric clinic staff to assess for tobacco
exposure and provide brief smoking cessation interventions
to caregivers and patients. The purpose of this study
was to evaluate the impact of this program and improve
future tobacco intervention efforts in pediatric clinics.


Methods. Eighty-six pediatric physicians and staff attended
at least one of three training sessions. A random
sample of pediatric medical records was selected pre-intervention
(n = 49) and post-intervention (n = 150). Electronic
medical records were reviewed to assess for documentation
of tobacco use intervention implemented in the clinic.


Results. Of the 199 pediatric clinic visits reviewed, 197 met
the study criteria. All but one visit documented an assessment
of tobacco exposure. Among children exposed to tobacco (n
= 42), providers were more likely to discuss tobacco use with
caregivers post-intervention (35.7%) compared to pre-intervention
(7.1%; p < 0.05). One in five caregivers in the postintervention
group were advised to quit (21.4%) compared to
the pre-intervention group (7.1%). In the post-intervention
group, 14.3% were referred to the state quitline compared to
no referrals in the pre-intervention group. The difference in
rates for providing advice and referral between pre-intervention
and post-intervention were not statistically significant.


Conclusions. Implementation of the Smoke Free for Kansas Kids
intervention was associated with modest improvements in clinic
tobacco intervention efforts, but many patients still failed to
receive optimal assessments or interventions. Additional efforts
may be needed to enhance this program. KS J Med 2017;10(1):7-11.

Downloads

Published

2019-01-14

How to Cite

Neerukonda, T., Scheuermann, T. S., Lauer, S. J., Hudelson, M., & Ellerbeck, E. F. (2019). An Evaluation of SmokeFree for Kansas Kids: An Intervention to Promote Tobacco Cessation in Pediatric Clinics. Kansas Journal of Medicine, 10(1), 7–11. https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v10i1.8641

Issue

Section

Original Research