Pediatric Farm Injuries

Morbidity and Mortality

Authors

  • Clint Rathje, D.O. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery
  • Ashley Venegas, M.S. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery
  • Stephen D. Helmer, Ph.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery; Via Christi Health, Wichita, KS
  • Rachel M. Drake, M.Ed. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery
  • Jeanette G. Ward, MSCR Chandler Regional Medical Center, Chandler, AZ
  • James M. Haan, M.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery; Via Christi Health, Wichita, KS

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v10i4.8670

Keywords:

Farm, Pediatrics, Children, Injury

Abstract

Introduction. Agriculture is an industry where family members often
live and work on the same premises. This study evaluated injury patterns
and outcomes in children from farm-related accidents.


Methods. A 10-year retrospective review of farm-accident related
injuries was conducted of patients 17 years and younger. Data collected
included demographics, injury mechanism, accident details, injury
severity and patterns, treatments required, hospitalization details, and
discharge disposition.


Results. Sixty-five patients were included; 58.5% were male and the
mean age was 9.7 years. Median Injury Severity Score and Glasgow
Coma Scale were 5 and 15, respectively. Accident mechanisms included
animal-related (43.1%), fall (21.5%), and motor vehicle (21.5%).
Soft tissue injuries, concussions and upper extremity fractures were
the most common injuries observed (58.5%, 29.2%, and 26.2%,
respectively). Twenty-six patients (40%) required surgical intervention.
Mean hospital length of stay was 3.4 ± 4.7 days. The majority of
patients were discharged to home (n = 62, 95.4%) and two patients
suffered permanent disability.


Conclusion. Overall, outcomes for this population were favorable,
but additional measures to increase safety, such as fall prevention,
animal handling, and driver safety training should be advocated.
KS J Med 2017;10(4):92-95.

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Published

2019-01-15

How to Cite

Rathje, C., Venegas, A., Helmer, S. D., Drake, R. M., Ward, J. G., & Haan, J. M. (2019). Pediatric Farm Injuries: Morbidity and Mortality. Kansas Journal of Medicine, 10(4), 92–95. https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v10i4.8670

Issue

Section

Original Research