Increasing Onshore Oil Production

An Unexpected Explosion in Trauma Patients

Authors

  • Dakota M. Urban, M.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery
  • Jeanette G. Ward, MS-CR Chandler Regional Medical Center, Chandler, AZ
  • Stephen D. Helmer, Ph.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery; Via Christi Hospital Saint Francis, Wichita, KS
  • Alan D. Cook, M.D. Chandler Regional Medical Center, Chandler, AZ
  • James M. Haan, M.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery; Via Christi Hospital Saint Francis, Wichita, KS

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v11i2.8684

Keywords:

oil and gas industry, oil and gas fields, trauma, wounds and injuries, safety

Abstract

Introduction. Few data currently exist which are focused on type
and severity of onshore oil extraction-related injuries. The purpose
of this study was to evaluate injury patterns among onshore oil field
operations.


Methods. A retrospective review was conducted of all trauma
patients aged 18 and older with an onshore oil field-related injury
admitted to an American College of Surgeons-verified level 1 trauma
center between January 1, 2003 and June 30, 2012. Data collected
included demographics, injury severity and details, hospital outcomes,
and disposition.


Results. A total of 66 patients met inclusion criteria. All patients
were male, of which the majority were Caucasian (81.8%, n = 54)
with an average age of 36.5 ± 11.8 years, injury severity score of 9.4 ±
8.9, and Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13.8 ± 3.4. Extremity injuries
were the most common (43.9%, n = 29), and most were the result
of being struck by an object (40.9%, n = 27). Approximately onethird
of patients (34.8%, n = 23) were admitted to the intensive care
unit. Nine patients (13.6%) required mechanical ventilation while
27 (40.9%) underwent operative treatment. The average hospital
length of stay was 5.8 ± 16.6 days, and most patients (78.8%, n = 52)
were discharged home. Four patients suffered permanent disabilities,
and there were two deaths.


Conclusions. Increased domestic onshore oil production inevitably
will result in higher numbers of oil field-related traumas. By focusing
on employees who are at the greatest risk for injuries and by targeting
the main causes of injuries, training programs can lead to a decrease
in injury incidence. Kans J Med 2018;11(2):34-37.

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Published

2019-01-15

How to Cite

Urban, D. M., Ward, J. G., Helmer, S. D., Cook, A. D., & Haan, J. M. (2019). Increasing Onshore Oil Production: An Unexpected Explosion in Trauma Patients. Kansas Journal of Medicine, 11(2), 34–37. https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v11i2.8684

Issue

Section

Original Research