Evaluation of Protective Equipment Used Among Motorbike Riders

Authors

  • Roxanne Stiles, M.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery
  • Clint Benge, M.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery
  • P.J. Stiles, M.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery
  • Fanglong Dong, Ph.D. Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA
  • Jeanette Ward, MS-CR Chandler Regional Medical Center, Chandler, AZ
  • Elizabeth Ablah, Ph.D., MPH University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
  • James M. Haan, M.D. University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Department of Surgery; Via Christi Hospital, Wichita, KS

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v11i2.8686

Keywords:

off-road motor vehicles, personal protective equipment, trauma, safety, Kansas

Abstract

Introduction. This study compared outcomes between patients
injured at a motorbike track, which requires riders to follow safety
equipment guidelines, and those involved in recreational riding where
safety equipment usage is voluntary.


Methods. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients presenting
with motorbike-related injuries at an American College of
Surgeons verified level-I trauma center between January 1, 2009 and
December 31, 2013. Data collected included demographics, injury
details, safety equipment use, hospitalization details, and discharge
disposition. Comparisons were made regarding protective equipment
usage.


Results. Among the 115 patients admitted, more than half (54.8%, n =
63) were injured on a motorbike track, and 45.2% (n = 52) were injured
in a recreational setting. The majority of patients were male (93.9%),
Caucasian (97.4%), and between the ages of 18 to 54 (64.4%). Helmet
usage was higher among track riders (95.2%, n = 60) than recreational
riders (46.2%, n = 24, p < 0.0001). Comparisons of injury severity and
outcomes between those who wore protective equipment and those
who did not were not significant.


Conclusions. Even though track riders wore protective equipment
more than recreational riders, there was no difference between the
groups regarding injury severity or hospital outcomes. These results
suggested that motocross riders should not rely on protective equipment
as the only measure of injury prevention.
Kans J Med 2018;11(2):44-47.

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Published

2019-01-15

How to Cite

Stiles, R., Benge, C., Stiles, P., Dong, F., Ward, J., Ablah, E., & Haan, J. M. (2019). Evaluation of Protective Equipment Used Among Motorbike Riders. Kansas Journal of Medicine, 11(2), 44–47. https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v11i2.8686

Issue

Section

Original Research