Using Fan Passion to Investigate Constraints to Student Attendance at College Football Games

Authors

  • Jason M. Simmons University of Cincinnati
  • Nels K. Popp University of North Carolina
  • Chad D. McEvoy Northern Illinois University
  • Steven M. Howell Northern Illinois University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1123/jis.2018-0019

Keywords:

barriers, fandom, inhibitors, leisure

Abstract

Given the decline in average student attendance at college football games nationwide, it is important for marketers to understand the constraints inhibiting student attendance. The current study addresses this issue by testing for differences in constraints affecting student nonattendance decisions based on their passion for the home team. Data were collected from students not attending games on six college campuses during actual football games. A total of 33 potential constraints to attendance were assessed. Results indicated statistically significant differences among intrapersonal, event-specific, and marketing-related constraints. Regardless of passion level, prior commitments to school and work were among the most highly-rated constraints to attendance. For highly-passionate fans, beverage costs, poor team performance, and watching the game on television were also highly-rated constraints. Low-passion fans, however, were constrained by time commitment necessary to attend, as well as lack of interest in football.

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Published

2018-12-01

How to Cite

Simmons, J. M., Popp, N. K., McEvoy, C. D., & Howell, S. M. (2018). Using Fan Passion to Investigate Constraints to Student Attendance at College Football Games. Journal of Intercollegiate Sport, 11(2), 193–213. https://doi.org/10.1123/jis.2018-0019