Development of Silica-Immobilized Vaccines for Improving Thermo-Tolerance and Shelf-Life

Authors

  • Nicole Montoya, B.S, Ch.E. Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Kaylee Barr Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Brian Kirchhoff Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Edward Reyes Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Jorge Umana Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Kalena Nichol Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Eric Hartman Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • William Picking, Ph.D. Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Fei Phillip Gao, Ph.D. Shankel Structural Biology Center, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • David R. Corbin, Ph.D. Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Mark B. Shiflett, Ph.D. Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v13i.14507

Keywords:

Mesoporous silica, Shigellosis, IpaD protein, Vaccines

Abstract

Introduction. It is estimated that 50% of vaccines produced annu- ally are wasted because effectivity is dependent on protein structure and heat exposure disrupts the intermolecular interactions that maintain this structure. Since 90% of vaccines require a temperature- controlled supply chain, it is necessary to create a cold chain system to minimize vaccine waste. We have developed a more sustainable technology via the adsorption of Invasion Plasmid Antigen D (IpaD) onto mesoporous silica gels, improving the thermal stability of pro- tein-based therapeutics.

Methods.xThe solution depletion method using UV-Vis was uti- lized to study the adsorption of IpaD onto silica gels. The silica-IpaD complex is heated above the denaturing temperature of the protein and then the IpaD is removed using N,N-Dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide (LDAO) and their secondary structure is tested using cir- cular dichroism (CD).

Results. Pore diameter, pore volume and surface area were charac- terized for seven different silica gels. Silica gels designated as 6389, 6378, and 6375 had an adsorption percentage above 95% at pore volumes of 2.2, 2.8 and 3.8 cm3 mg-1, respectively. CD analyses con- firmed that the adsorbed IpaD after the heat treatment displayed a similar “W” shape CD signal as the native IpaD, indicating the con- servation of α-helices. In contrast, the unprotected IpaD after being exposed to high temperature shows a flat CD signal, demonstrating the loss of secondary structure.

Conclusion. We have successfully increased the thermo-tolerance for IpaD using mesoporous silica and continue to further optimize mesoporous silica’s physiochemical properties to improve adsorption and desorption yields.

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Published

2020-02-26

How to Cite

Montoya, N., Barr, K., Kirchhoff, B., Reyes, E., Umana, J., Nichol, K., Hartman, E., Picking, W., Gao, F. P., Corbin, D. R., & Shiflett, M. B. (2020). Development of Silica-Immobilized Vaccines for Improving Thermo-Tolerance and Shelf-Life. Kansas Journal of Medicine, 13, 6–9. https://doi.org/10.17161/kjm.v13i.14507