Amyloid Myopathy as an Inclusion Body Myositis Mimic

Authors

  • Andrew Heim University of Kansas Medical Center
  • Anai Hamasaki Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center
  • Mazen Dimachkie University of Kansas Medical Center
  • Mamatha Pasnoor University of Kansas Medical Center
  • Omar Jawdat University of Kansas Medical Center
  • Jeffrey Statland University of Kansas Medical Center
  • Ryan Jacobson
  • Barbara Distad
  • Michael Weiss
  • Melanie Glenn
  • Gary Gallagher
  • Sandra Camelo-Piragua
  • Laura Herbelin

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17161/rrnmf.v1i4.13699

Abstract

Introduction: Amyloid myopathy is a rare presentation of systemic amyloidosis. Amyloid myopathy can be initially misdiagnosed as sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM).

Methods: We report 4 cases of amyloid myopathy clinically mimicking inclusion body myositis and initially thought to be phenotypically IBM by neuromuscular experts.

Results: Case 1 is an 81-year-old woman who presented with distal arm and proximal leg asymmetric weakness (myopathy pattern 4). Case 2 is a 76-year-old man with primary systemic amyloidosis who presented with myopathy pattern 4 and progressive dysphagia for four years. Case 3 is an 82-year-old man with progressive myopathy pattern 4 weakness and swallowing difficulty. Case 4 is a 62-year-old man with progressive bilateral finger flexor weakness. Muscle biopsies in all 4 cases showed perivascular amyloid deposits

Discussion: Amyloid myopathy may be clinically indistinguishable from IBM. Muscle biopsy is of critical importance in the evaluation of patients suspected to have IBM.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Downloads

Published

2020-09-21

How to Cite

Heim, A., Hamasaki, A., Dimachkie, M., Pasnoor, M., Jawdat, O., Statland, J., Jacobson, R., Distad, B., Weiss, M., Glenn, M., Gallagher, G., Camelo-Piragua, S., & Herbelin, L. (2020). Amyloid Myopathy as an Inclusion Body Myositis Mimic. RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal, 1(4), 28-32. https://doi.org/10.17161/rrnmf.v1i4.13699

Issue

Section

Clinic Stuff (Case Reports)